Substance Use

Dr. Josephakis Charalambous

Family Physician Hired a Hit Man to Silence Her…Permanently

Born on the island of Cyprus, Josephakis Charalambous was 8 years old when his parents immigrated to Canada, settling in Vancouver, British Columbia. Although he was close to his mother and sister, somewhere in his upbringing, he came to despise women and view them merely as sexual objects. He was known to engage frequently with prostitutes to satisfy his seemingly insatiable sexual drive and desire to control women. It is said that the reason Charalambous wanted to become a doctor in the first place was to attract women with his professional status. But once he became an MD, women didn’t flock to him as he imagined.

Emergency Medicine Physicians

12 Days of Christmas Seen Through the Eyes of Emergency Medicine Physicians

ER docs offer a dozen tips to keep all days safe and healthy

The joyful song about French hens, turtle doves, and a partridge rings in a cheerful holiday season for all. And for those celebrating the 12 Days of Christmas, it’s a wonderful time of the year.

As the celebrations of the season go into full swing, emergency medicine physicians and their teams know to expect all types of medical situations arriving in their emergency rooms.

And, to keep Pennsylvanians from making unnecessary trips to their local emergency rooms on what should be days of joy, physicians share 12 ideas on how you can enjoy a safer holiday season.

Light Drinking Paired with Acetaminophen Increases Risk of Kidney Dysfunction

Even Light Drinking Paired with Acetaminophen Increases Risk of Kidney Dysfunction

New research finds that the combination of acetaminophen paired with alcohol — even if consumed moderately or lightly — can increase the risk of kidney dysfunction, according to new research released today at the American Public Health Association’s 141st Annual Meeting in Boston.

Results from the study indicated that neither taking a therapeutic amount of acetaminophen nor consuming a light to moderate amount of alcohol posed a particularly greater risk to an individual’s kidneys. However, when taken in combination with one another, results showed a 123 percent increase in risk of kidney dysfunction.

Dr. Michael Mastromarino

Michael Mastromarino: The Organ Grinder

Biomedical Tissue Services was his company’s name; being a modern-day grave robber was more his game. Dr. Michael Mastromarino was a successful oral surgeon with a practice in New Jersey. He had a beautiful home, a wife, and 2 sons. He coauthored a prominent book on dental implants, Smile: How Dental Implants Can Transform Your Life. He was highly regarded in his field. How did this seemingly successful man later become known as the Organ Grinder and the Brooklyn Bone Snatcher?

Fregoli Syndrome

Murder, Intrigue, and a Case Involving Fregoli Syndrome?

On January 26, 1996, the Newtown, PA police and 3 SWAT teams surrounded the du Pont mansion on the Foxcatcher estate, about 15 miles west of Philadelphia. Earlier that day, John du Pont, the chemical company heir, shot and killed his longtime friend, Dave Schultz, 36, an Olympic gold medalist in freestyle wrestling. Armed with several guns, du Pont refused to surrender to police and held up in his mansion. A standoff commenced. It was particularly cold, and after 2 days, the police shut off the power and heat. When Mr. du Pont went outside to investigate, they captured him.

Bath Salts Could Be More Addictive than Meth

‘Bath Salts’ Stimulant Could Be More Addictive than Meth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have published one of the first laboratory studies of MDPV, an emerging recreational drug that has been sold as “bath salts.” The TSRI researchers confirmed the drug’s powerful stimulant effects in rats and found evidence that it could be more addictive than methamphetamine, one of the most addictive substances to date.

“We observed that rats will press a lever more often to get a single infusion of MPDV than they will for meth, across a fairly wide dose range,” said TSRI Associate Professor Michael A. Taffe, who was the principal investigator of the study.

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