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Stress-Related Disorders

Migraine Attacks Increase Following Stress

Migraine Attacks Increase Following Stress “Let-Down”

Migraine sufferers who experienced reduced stress from one day to the next are at significantly increased risk of migraine onset on the subsequent day, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Montefiore Headache Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University. Stress has long been believed to be a common headache trigger. In this study, researchers found that relaxation following heightened stress was an even more significant trigger for migraine attacks. Findings may aid in recommending preventive treatments and behavioral interventions. The study was published online today in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Stress Hormone Could Trigger Mechanism for the Onset of Alzheimer's

Stress Hormone Could Trigger Mechanism for the Onset of Alzheimer’s

A chemical hormone released in the body as a reaction to stress could be a key trigger of the mechanism for the late onset of Alzheimer’s disease, according to a study by researchers at Temple University.

Previous studies have shown that the chemical hormone corticosteroid, which is released into the body’s blood as a stress response, is found at levels two to three times higher in Alzheimer’s patients than non-Alzheimer’s patients.

Salk Scientists Find Potential Therapeutic Target for Cushing's Disease

Salk Scientists Find Potential Therapeutic Target for Cushing’s Disease

The protein, called TR4 (testicular orphan nuclear receptor 4), is one of the human body’s 48 nuclear receptors, a class of proteins found in cells that are responsible for sensing hormones and, in response, regulating the expression of specific genes. Using a genome scan, the Salk team discovered that TR4 regulates a gene that produces adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which is overproduced by pituitary tumors in Cushing’s disease (CD). The findings were published in the May 6 early online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Hair Analysis Reveals Elevated Stress Hormone Levels Raise Cardiovascular Risk

Hair Analysis Reveals Elevated Stress Hormone Levels Raise Cardiovascular Risk

Unlike a blood test that captures a snapshot of stress hormone levels at a single point in time, a scalp hair analysis can be used to view trends in levels of the stress hormone cortisol over the course of several months. This approach allows researchers to have a better sense of the variability in cortisol levels. The study found seniors who had higher long-term levels of the stress hormone cortisol were more likely to have cardiovascular disease.

Cardiovascular Risk May Remain for Treated Cushing’s Disease Patients

Cardiovascular Risk May Remain for Treated Cushing’s Disease Patients

Cushing’s disease is a rare condition where the body is exposed to excess cortisol – a stress hormone produced in the adrenal gland – for long periods of time.

Researchers have long known that patients who have Cushing’s disease are at greater risk of developing and dying from cardiovascular disease than the average person. This study examined whether the risk could be eliminated or reduced when the disease is controlled. Researchers found that these risk factors remained long after patients were exposed to excess cortisol.

Exercise Shields Children from Stress

Exercise Shields Children from Stress

Chevy Chase, MD — Exercise may play a key role in helping children cope with stressful situations, according to a recent study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology Metabolism (JCEM).

When they are exposed to everyday stressors, the study found sedentary children had surges of cortisol – a hormone linked to stress. The most active children had little or no increase in their cortisol levels in similar situations.

Managing Your Staff

Managing Your Staff

There is no blueprint available that will detail how you should effectively manage your staff. Successful supervisors have varying styles, and you should adopt an approach that suits your needs and personality while creating the appropriate atmosphere for your office. Whichever manner you implement, the goal is the same: inspire the confidence and respect of your staff. Set a good example by consistently being reasonable and fair. Really listen to your employees and, as in life outside the office, empathize with their concerns. This will generate the trust you require to build the practice you desire. Following are some tips that can significantly improve staff and practice management.

How Doctors Can Manage Stress

How Doctors Can Manage Stress

People rarely consider the levels of stress that physicians have to cope with throughout their careers, as well as on a daily basis, including getting into and graduating medical school, clinical training, establishing a practice, doctor-patient relationships, medical malpractice suits, and long work days, among many others. Stress will eventually affect most physicians. This job stress can lead to exhaustion, poor health, depression, and substance abuse. If you can’t take care of yourself, how do you expect to take care of your patients?

Managing Office Staff

Managing Office Staff

There is no “best way” to manage your staff. Effective managers have varying styles. What’s important is the ability to inspire confidence and the respect of your staff. A good manager leads by setting a good example. Being reasonable and fair all of the time, and being right most of the time, creates the trust you need. Here are some tips that can significantly improve staff and practice management.

How Physicians Cope With Stress

How Physicians Can Cope With Stress

Everyone in every profession has to cope with stress. Some stress in the workplace is normal; it can be the factor that provides us with the energy and motivation we need to stay creative and productive. But too much stress can be toxic and have negative consequences.

Few people realize just how much stress we, as physicians, live with.

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