Myocardial Infarction

Inexpensive Drug Costing Less Than Three Dollars May Minimize Damage from Heart Attack

Inexpensive Drug Costing Less Than Three Dollars May Minimize Damage from Heart Attack

Collaborative Study by Spain and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Shows Potential Benefits of Administering Beta-Blocker Medication to Heart Attack Patients in Ambulance

Early treatment of heart attack patients with an inexpensive beta-blocker drug called metoprolol, while in transit to the hospital, can significantly reduce damage to the heart during a myocardial infarction, according to clinical trial study results published Oct. 1 in the journal Circulation. The study was a collaboration between Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) in Spain and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York.

Acid Reflux Drug May Cause Heart Disease

Acid Reflux Drug May Cause Heart Disease

Acid Reflux Drugs that help millions of people cope may also cause cardiovascular disease, report scientists from Houston Methodist Hospital and two other institutions in an upcoming issue of Circulation (now online). It is the first time researchers have shown how proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, might cause cardiovascular problems.

In human tissue and mouse models, the researchers found PPIs caused the constriction of blood vessels. If taken regularly, PPIs could lead to a variety of cardiovascular problems over time, including hypertension and a weakened heart. In the paper, the scientists call for a broad, large-scale study to determine whether PPIs are dangerous.

Antidepressant Reduces Stress-Induced Heart Condition

Antidepressant Reduces Stress-Induced Heart Condition

A drug commonly used to treat depression and anxiety may improve a stress-related heart condition in people with stable coronary heart disease, according to researchers at Duke Medicine.

Compared with those receiving placebo, people who took the antidepressant escitalopram (sold as Lexapro) were more than two-and-a-half times less likely to have mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI), a heart condition brought on by mental stress. The findings, published in the May 22/29, 2013 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, add to the current understanding of how negative emotions affect cardiovascular health.

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