Myocardial Infarction

Sports Cardiology

Basic Elements of Sports Cardiology

Sports cardiology is becoming an autonomous subspecialty medical field in the US. Cardiologists are leading the way and defining their role within the space that treats the unique physiology of athletes and the needs of individuals who exercise. The American College of Cardiology has developed a Sports and Exercise Cardiology discipline within their guidelines to address the growing population of these cardiac patients.

Death During Sex

Death During Sex

Over-activity of the sympathetic nervous system (which controls ejaculation as well as the actions of the heart and blood vessels) can bring on sudden death due to cardiac arrest during or shortly after sexual activities. In 2011, Dr. Issa Dahabreh, affiliated with Tufts Medical Center in Boston, conducted an analysis of 14 studies along with a colleague, Jessica Paulus, to quantify the risk of having a heart attack or sudden cardiac death brought about by sex. The team of doctors discovered that people are 2.7 times more likely to have a heart attack either during or shortly after sex compared to when they are inactive. However, they point out that the period of risk is brief, that is, either during the act itself or about 1 to 2 hours after sexual activity. They go on to report that individual risk is minimal. The researchers further highlight the fact that other studies have shown that regular physical activity reduces the risk of heart attacks or sudden cardiac death by 30%.

Powerful Anti-Smoking Campaign Focuses on Teens

Powerful Anti-Smoking Campaign Focuses on Teens

Targeting teens is nothing new for the tobacco industry. They know the statistics for hooking lifelong smokers. Twelve to 17 year olds are at the highest risk of starting smoking. Marketing to America’s youth has been prevalent since the 1920s. Just because Joe Camel has gone away doesn’t mean these clever marketers have.

The US Food and Drug Administration is fighting back. The FDA has made a commitment through their latest anti-smoking advertising campaign to make an impact on teenage smoking. The new ads are meant to be graphic and powerful to drive the message home. One ad has a young man pulling out his own tooth to pay for cigarettes. Another has a young lady leaving behind a piece of her flesh.

The Wonder of Aspirin

The Wonder of Aspirin

Imagine a modern drug with the ability to reduce fevers, ease aches and pain, fight off inflammation, and act as an anticoagulant for heart disease patients. It might sound crazy, but a new drug with all of aspirin’s benefits would have a hard time getting FDA approval today. Chances are it would never make it to the FDA at all. In fact, if you were somehow able to rewrite history so that aspirin had been discovered this year, it is almost certain that it would die in the lab and no drug company would ever touch it.

Kristen Griffith: The Killer Nurse

NIGHTENGALE’S NIGHTMARES: Kristen The Killer Nurse

During childhood, friends and neighbors knew Kristen to be a pathological liar. She would tell people that she was related to the notorious ax murderer Lizzie Borden. In high school, boyfriends described Kristen as scheming, often faking suicide attempts. She also abused them both verbally and physically. And when upset, she was known to tamper with their cars or attack them with her nails.

Smartphones Now Instant Heart Rate Monitors

Smartphones Now Instant Heart Rate Monitors

Smart phones are getting smarter all the time, but this time, they are getting healthier as well. There are more than 43,000 apps that focus on health, and heart monitoring apps are among the most popular. The new Samsung Galaxy S5 smartphone even has a heart rate monitor built directly into the back of the device. Rumor has it, however, that Apple is trying to take heart monitoring to the next level by even being able to predict heart attacks with their devices. Here’s what you need to know about the latest heart monitoring smartphone tools.

Clues to an Old World Mystery From a New World Disease

Clues to an Old World Mystery From a New World Disease

In 1993, a mysterious outbreak unnerved residents and bewildered investigators in the Four Corners region of the southwest US. Late in the morning on May 14, paramedics rushed a 19-year-old Navajo man suffering from acute respiratory failure to the Indian Medical Center in Gallup, New Mexico. Paramedics and doctors alike were unable to resuscitate him. Postmortem X-rays revealed his lungs were filled with fluid. Even more puzzling was the fact that this young man was healthy and athletic. He was a track star with no history of illness except for mild flu-like symptoms a few days earlier. Because his death was unexplained, medical reports and his body were turned over to the Office of the Medical Investigator for further review and autopsy.

"Smarter" Blood Pressure Guidelines Could Prevent Heart Attacks and Strokes

“Smarter” Blood Pressure Guidelines Could Prevent Heart Attacks and Strokes

Care that emphasizes patients’ risks of heart disease could prevent up to 180,000 more heart attacks and strokes a year using less medication over all

A new way of using blood pressure-lowering medications could prevent heart attacks and strokes by more than a fourth – up to 180,000 a year – while using less medication overall, according to new research from the University of Michigan Health System and the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System.

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