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Drug Abuse

ecstasy testing

Ecstasy: The Next Anti-Anxiety Treatment?

Clinical trials studying the effects of MDMA on patients suffering from anxiety caused by life-threatening illnesses are set to begin just months after the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) approved testing of the drug.

Ozzy Osbourne

What Made Ozzy Osbourne a Babbling Mess?

On August 17, 2003, rock legend Ozzy Osbourne was invited to Wrigley Field to sing Take Me Out To The Ball Game during the seventh-inning stretch of a Chicago Cubs game. What ensued was a garbled-up, unintelligible rendition of the famous song so bad that Osbourne went down as the worst Wrigley singer in history. Over the next few days the scene was replayed on national television, making a mockery of the mumbling singer. That incident, said Osbournes manager-wife Sharon, was the last straw; she claimed that Ozzys doctor was overprescribing him a host of powerful antipsychotic and tranquilizing drugs, which contributed to his bizarre behavior.

Domestic Violence and Alcohol

Link Between Domestic Violence and Alcohol, Not Marijuana

It has been known for decades that there is a link between alcohol consumption and domestic violence, but the research is slim when it comes to marijuana. The participants were male and female college students at least 18 years of age who had been in a relationship for at least a month, had face-to-face contact with their partner at least 2 times a week, and had consumed alcohol in the previous month. The studies asked participants to complete an online diary once a day for 90 days. Based on the results, the odds of physical, psychological, and sexual violence among men increased with the use of alcohol, and rose with each drink consumed, whereas marijuana use was unrelated to violence between couples. For women, alcohol use increased the odds of physical and psychological aggression, and marijuana use increased the likelihood of psychological aggression.

Emergency Medicine Physicians

12 Days of Christmas Seen Through the Eyes of Emergency Medicine Physicians

ER docs offer a dozen tips to keep all days safe and healthy

The joyful song about French hens, turtle doves, and a partridge rings in a cheerful holiday season for all. And for those celebrating the 12 Days of Christmas, it’s a wonderful time of the year.

As the celebrations of the season go into full swing, emergency medicine physicians and their teams know to expect all types of medical situations arriving in their emergency rooms.

And, to keep Pennsylvanians from making unnecessary trips to their local emergency rooms on what should be days of joy, physicians share 12 ideas on how you can enjoy a safer holiday season.

Dr. Charles Cullen

Charles Cullen, The Killer Nurse: A Deeper Evil

After midnight, near the end of a 7-hour-long police interrogation that began on December 14, 2003, Charles Cullen said, “I did not want (people) to see me as this, what I am.” Somerset County detective Timothy Braun then asked him, “What are you, Charles?” The 43-year-old nurse replied, “A man, person, who was trusted and had responsibility for a lot of people dying…I hate myself for it ’cause I don’t believe I had the right, but I couldn’t stop, I couldn’t.” No, he couldn’t, and incredibly, neither could the medical establishment stop his reign of terror at the time.

Bath Salts Could Be More Addictive than Meth

‘Bath Salts’ Stimulant Could Be More Addictive than Meth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have published one of the first laboratory studies of MDPV, an emerging recreational drug that has been sold as “bath salts.” The TSRI researchers confirmed the drug’s powerful stimulant effects in rats and found evidence that it could be more addictive than methamphetamine, one of the most addictive substances to date.

“We observed that rats will press a lever more often to get a single infusion of MPDV than they will for meth, across a fairly wide dose range,” said TSRI Associate Professor Michael A. Taffe, who was the principal investigator of the study.

Kristen Heather Gilbert RN

Kristen Heather Gilbert

Meet Kristen Heather Gilbert, a smart, accomplished RN, but a troubled soul.

In her youth, Kristen Strickland was known as a pathological liar. According to friends and neighbors, she often made the unfounded claim that she was a distant relative of the infamous ax murderer Lizzie Borden. Ex-boyfriends described Kristen as strange and controlling, eventually exhibiting a pattern of verbal and physical abuse toward them. For attention, she would fake suicide attempts, or when angry, she would tamper with her boyfriends’ cars or physically attack them, scratching them with her nails.