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Teen Moms at Greater Risk for Later Obesity

Teen Moms at Greater Risk for Later Obesity

A new study debunks the myth that younger moms are more likely to “bounce back” after having a baby – teenage pregnancy actually makes women more likely to become obese.

Women who give birth as teens are significantly more likely to be overweight or obese later in life than women who were not teen moms, University of Michigan Health System researchers found.

Month of Birth Impacts on Immune System Development

Month of Birth Impacts on Immune System Development

Newborn babies’ immune system development and levels of vitamin D have been found to vary according to their month of birth, according to new research.

The research, from scientists at Queen Mary, University of London and the University of Oxford, provides a potential biological basis as to why an individual’s risk of developing the neurological condition multiple sclerosis (MS) is influenced by their month of birth. It also supports the need for further research into the potential benefits of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy.

Nanosponges Soak Up Toxins

Nanosponges Soak Up Toxins Released by Bacterial Infections and Venom

Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have invented a “nanosponge” capable of safely removing a broad class of dangerous toxins from the bloodstream – including toxins produced by MRSA, E. coli, poisonous snakes and bees. These nanosponges, which thus far have been studied in mice, can neutralize “pore-forming toxins,” which destroy cells by poking holes in their cell membranes. Unlike other anti-toxin platforms that need to be custom synthesized for individual toxin type, the nanosponges can absorb different pore-forming toxins regardless of their molecular structures. In a study against alpha-haemolysin toxin from MRSA, pre-innoculation with nanosponges enabled 89 percent of mice to survive lethal doses. Administering nanosponges after the lethal dose led to 44 percent survival.

Hair Analysis Reveals Elevated Stress Hormone Levels Raise Cardiovascular Risk

Hair Analysis Reveals Elevated Stress Hormone Levels Raise Cardiovascular Risk

Unlike a blood test that captures a snapshot of stress hormone levels at a single point in time, a scalp hair analysis can be used to view trends in levels of the stress hormone cortisol over the course of several months. This approach allows researchers to have a better sense of the variability in cortisol levels. The study found seniors who had higher long-term levels of the stress hormone cortisol were more likely to have cardiovascular disease.

Gene Found that Regenerates Heart Tissue

Gene Found that Regenerates Heart Tissue

The co-first authors of the study are Dr. Ahmed I. Mahmoud, who is now a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University; Dr. Fatih Kocabas, who is now a postdoctoral fellow at North American College; and Dr. Shalini A. Muralidhar, a postdoctoral research fellow II of internal medicine. Other researchers at UT Southwestern involved in the study are Wataru Kimura, a visiting senior researcher of internal medicine; Ahmed Koura, now a medical student at Ain Shams University in Egypt; Dr. Enzo Porrello, research fellow and faculty member at the University of Queensland in Australia; and Suwannee Thet, a research associate of internal medicine.

Ordinary Skin Cells Morphed into Functional Brain Cells

Ordinary Skin Cells Morphed into Functional Brain Cells

Scientists at CWRU School of Medicine Discover New Technique that Holds Promise for the Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis and Cerebral Palsy

Researchers at Case Western Reserve School of Medicine have discovered a technique that directly converts skin cells to the type of brain cells destroyed in patients with multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy and other so-called myelin disorders.

Scarification

Scarification

Scarification involves cutting, burning, or branding words or images into the skin in order to make the resulting scar a permanent body modification. Sort of like a tattoo on steroids!

In order to prevent scarification tools from cutting too deep, burning at too high a temperature, or burning too long, the scarification artist should have a thorough knowledge of human skin anatomy. And, because it’s possible that diseases can be passed into the air during the procedure, additional precautions, such as wearing masks, need to be incorporated into the process.

The Diethylstilbestrol Tragedy

Problems in Research: Regulations—The Diethylstilbestrol Tragedy

Over the past 60 years, pharmacological developments have transformed medicine. With the advent of antipsychotics, doctors were able to effectively treat patients with psychoses. Prior to then, treatments for major depression, schizophrenia, or other psychoses were limited and had very poor outcomes. Lobotomies, high-voltage electroconvulsive therapy, and institutionalization were the standard of care. Today, pharmaceuticals have radically changed all areas of medicine.

Clark Gable

Clark Gable

It is ironic that the iconic King of Hollywood, who starred next to the most beautiful actresses of their time, once remarked: If any child of mine becomes an actor, I will turn in my grave!

William Clark Gable was born on February 1, 1901, in Cadiz, Ohio. When he was 17, the young man was inspired after watching the play The Bird of Paradise. It was then that he decided he wanted to be an actor. In high school, Gable worked in his father’s oil fields and as a horse manager. After financial difficulties, the family moved to Akron and his father bought a farm. Gable worked a bit on the farm before becoming restless. He then took a job at the B.F. Goodrich tire factory in town.

Porphyria

Porphyria

The name porphyria is taken from the Greek root for purple (porphyra). Porphyrias are a group of 8 inherited or acquired disorders of heme biosynthesis. A deficiency in any of the 8 enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway can result in the accumulation and excretion of intermediary metabolites. Patients generally present with either neurovisceral (acute) or cutaneous symptoms but sometimes they may have mixed symptoms. One of the earliest descriptions of porphyria was made by B.J. Stokvis, MD, in 1889. In 1930, the German chemist Hans Fischer described porphyrins as The compounds which make grass green and blood red. In 1937, Jan Gosata Walenstrom coined the term porphyria he published research identifying one type of porphyria, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). By 1960, all 8 types of porphyria had been described, as well as environmental factors that affect the course of the disease.  Porphyria research in the 1980s and 1990s identified the molecular defects in each type.

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