HealthDay News — According to a study published in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, higher prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) is associated with increased risk of preterm delivery in the absence of chronic diseases.

Sung Soo Kim, PhD, MPH, from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development in Rockville, Maryland, and colleagues assessed the association between prepregnancy BMI and the risk of preterm delivery.

Researchers used data from the Consortium on Safe Labor (2002 to 2008) on women with a prepregnancy BMI ≥18.5 kg/m² and without chronic diseases.


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The researchers found that relative risk of spontaneous preterm delivery was increased for extremely preterm among overweight nulliparas (1.26; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94 to 1.70), obese class I (1.88; 95% CI, 1.30 to 2.71), and obese class II/III (1.99; 95% CI, 1.32 to 3.01).

However, risk was decreased for moderate-to-late preterm delivery among overweight multiparas (0.90; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.97), obese class I (0.87; 95% CI, 0.78 to 0.97), and obese class II/III (0.79; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.90). Preterm delivery risk was increased with prepregnancy BMI in a dose-response manner.

“Prepregnancy BMI was associated with increased risk of preterm delivery even in the absence of chronic diseases, but the association was heterogeneous by preterm categories, gestational age, and parity,” the authors write.

Reference

Kim SS, et al. “Spontaneous And Indicated Preterm Delivery Risk Is Increased Among Overweight And Obese Women Without Prepregnancy Chronic Disease”. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. 2017. doi: 10.1111/1471-0528.14613 [Epub ahead of print]

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