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Point: Dietary Supplements Can Mitigate Poor Diet, Improve Health

Point: Dietary Supplements Can Mitigate Poor Diet, Improve Health

Although it is estimated that more than 166 million Americans use dietary supplements, many healthcare providers are unfamiliar with how these substances are regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration.

Resist the Script: Antibiotic Overuse in Pneumonia — An Expert Roundtable

Resist the Script: Antibiotic Overuse in Pneumonia — An Expert Roundtable

A shift toward personalized medicine in pneumonia management would involve refining the diagnostic categories to include viral pneumonia, bacterial pneumonia, and noninfectious respiratory disease.

Reducing the Reliance on Opioids for Cancer Pain: Is the Switch to Cannabis a Viable Option?

Reducing the Reliance on Opioids for Cancer Pain: Is the Switch to Cannabis a Viable Option?

Articles discussing the use of cannabis as a substitute for opioids highlight the limitations of the existing scientific evidence in the field.

Improving Care for T2D in Patients With Severe Mental Illness: Expert Q&A

Improving Care for T2D in Patients With Severe Mental Illness: Expert Q&A

Despite the clear need for improved management of T2D in patients with SMI, there is scant evidence regarding effective treatment strategies for this group.

ACIP Updates Recommendations for US Adult Immunization Schedule

ACIP Updates Recommendations for US Adult Immunization Schedule

The ACIP and CDC have approved and released 2019 recommendations for the adult immunization schedule in the US.

Clinical Challenge: Addressing Psoriasis and Comorbid Obesity

Clinical Challenge: Addressing Psoriasis and Comorbid Obesity

Obesity is an independent risk factor for the development of psoriasis and is associated with a worse prognosis.

An Evidence-Based Road Map to Navigating the Opioid Epidemic

An Evidence-Based Road Map to Navigating the Opioid Epidemic

This rise in prescribing of prescription opioids in the last 2 decades of the 20th century occurred at a time during which medical professionals were urged to resort to prescription opioids to manage untreated and chronic noncancer pain.

Crisis in Congo: The Search for an Effective Ebola Vaccine

Crisis in Congo: The Search for an Effective Ebola Vaccine

Since it was first identified in 1976, Ebola has affected several African countries, most recently the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Societies Release Updated Guidelines for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation

Societies Release Updated Guidelines for the Management of Atrial Fibrillation

In order to revise the guidelines, the Task Force reviewed clinical trials presented at the annual scientific meetings of the ACC, AHA, HRS, and European Society of Cardiology in addition to other peer-reviewed, published data.

In the Spotlight: How Racism Affects the Healthcare Workforce

In the Spotlight: How Racism Affects the Healthcare Workforce

Racism is embedded in all US institutions, including medicine — so what steps are being taken to improve the well-being of the healthcare workforce?

Protecting Your Practice From Data Breaches: An Expert Interview

Protecting Your Practice From Data Breaches: An Expert Interview

To shed light on issues of cybersecurity in medical practices, MPR spoke to Michael J Sacopulos, JD, CEO of Medical Risk Institute (MRI), a firm that provides "proactive counsel" to the healthcare community to identify where liability risks originate and to reduce or remove those risks.

Machine Learning in Dermatology: Overcoming Data Gaps in Skin Cancer Detection for Smarter Diagnosis

Machine Learning in Dermatology: Overcoming Data Gaps in Skin Cancer Detection for Smarter Diagnosis

We can leverage the agility of machine learning to point out unmet clinical needs and improve clinical practice.

AI-Powered Cancer Diagnoses in Dermatology Leave Patients of Color in the Dust

AI-Powered Cancer Diagnoses in Dermatology Leave Patients of Color in the Dust

We use artificial intelligence in nearly every aspect of our lives — but how does AI fare in the physician's exam room?

The Robot Will See You Now: The Increasing Role of Robotics in Psychiatric Care

The Robot Will See You Now: The Increasing Role of Robotics in Psychiatric Care

Dr Pransky shares some examples of robots that have shown impressive psychiatric applications, as well as her thoughts on giving robots the critical role of delivering healthcare to human beings.

Asthma Control and Medication Adherence: Time for a Digital Intervention

Asthma Control and Medication Adherence: Time for a Digital Intervention

Digital interventions, such as web-based programs, mobile apps, and text messaging, have been found to improve asthma control and medication adherence while reducing the use of "rescue" medications.

Sleep-Related Violence In Forensic Cases: Overview & Expert Interview

Sleep-Related Violence In Forensic Cases: Overview & Expert Interview

With the growth of the field of sleep medicine, there has been an increase in referrals to experts who specialize in disorders that result in sleep-related violence.

Banding Together Against Boards: How Physicians Are Fighting the MOC Program

Banding Together Against Boards: How Physicians Are Fighting the MOC Program

A group of physicians has banded together to file a class-action lawsuit against the American Board of Internal Medicine and the organization's monopolization on the process of board certification.

HIV & Cancer Risk: Expert Interview

HIV & Cancer Risk: Expert Interview

Although rates of AIDS-defining malignancies have declined in recent decades, cancer remains a leading cause of mortality in people living with HIV.

Part 2: Adolescent Tech Use & Mental Health: Expert Perspective

Part 2: Adolescent Tech Use & Mental Health: Expert Perspective

For part 2 of this article, Psychiatry Advisor interviewed Dr Brenda L Curtis, whose research focuses on "big data" generated from social networking sites, technology-based interventions for substance use disorders and related issues, and Internet research ethics.

Adolescent Technology Use and Mental Health: An Expert Roundtable

Adolescent Technology Use and Mental Health: An Expert Roundtable

The use of technology is also transforming the mental health landscape, with significant implications for clinicians who work with adolescents, in particular.

Addressing Workplace Violence Against Physicians

Addressing Workplace Violence Against Physicians

Once revered and idolized by society and patients, physicians are increasingly being subjected to verbal and physical violence at work.

Buyers' Clubs to Improve HCV Treatment Access

Buyers' Clubs to Improve HCV Treatment Access

As part of the World Health Organization's goal to eliminate viral hepatitis as a global health threat by 2030, the incidence of chronic new infections must decrease by 90%.

Managing Psoriatic Arthritis: Updated 2018 Recommendations From ACR/NPF

Managing Psoriatic Arthritis: Updated 2018 Recommendations From ACR/NPF

The American College of Rheumatology and the National Psoriasis Foundation have released 2018 joint recommendations for the treatment of psoriatic arthritis.

Mentoring Women in the #MeToo Era: Expert Roundtable

Mentoring Women in the #MeToo Era: Expert Roundtable

Despite record numbers of women working in medicine, instances of gender discrimination and sexual harassment continue to proliferate.

Telling Time by Asthma, Allergy Symptom Severity

Telling Time by Asthma, Allergy Symptom Severity

Clinicians are gaining a better understanding of how asthma and allergies are regulated by the circadian clock, which will help patients better alleviate their symptoms.

Coping With Challenges When Working the Holidays

Coping With Challenges When Working the Holidays

For many physicians, working during the holiday season is simply part of the job.

Navigating Social Media Issues in Medical Practice: An Expert Interview

Navigating Social Media Issues in Medical Practice: An Expert Interview

Issues that affect employees in all industries are compounded by a unique set of additional concerns that affect employees of medical practices.

Share Your Medical New Year's Resolutions

Share Your Medical New Year's Resolutions

What do you resolve to focus on in 2019?

The Intersection of Eating and Alcohol Disorders: Detecting and Managing "Drunkorexia"

The Intersection of Eating and Alcohol Disorders: Detecting and Managing "Drunkorexia"

Drunkorexia is a term referring to limiting food intake prior to alcohol consumption, which may lead to eating disorders in college students.

Living With Periodic Paralysis: An Interview With Jacob Levitt, MD

Living With Periodic Paralysis: An Interview With Jacob Levitt, MD

Neurology Advisor spoke with Jacob Levitt, MD, for his unique medical and patient perspectives on PP.

Traveling by Airplane With COPD: Expert Advice

Traveling by Airplane With COPD: Expert Advice

Healthcare providers should educate all patients with COPD about their flight-related risks and the need to seek medical advice before flying.

Thirdhand Smoke: A New Concept Rising From Old Residue

Thirdhand Smoke: A New Concept Rising From Old Residue

The concept of thirdhand smoke was originally introduced in 1953, when rodent studies first demonstrated the carcinogenic effects of the residue from tobacco smoke.

Experts Offer Tips on Integrating Medical Marijuana Into Geriatric Practice

Experts Offer Tips on Integrating Medical Marijuana Into Geriatric Practice

A study by the National Survey of Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) found that from 2002-2014 the proportion of adults aged 50 to 64 who reported cannabis use in the past year more than tripled from 2.9% to 9.0%. Among adults age 65 or older, there was more than a ten-fold increase (from 0.2% to 2.1%).

Update on the Ethics of Mandating HPV Vaccination

Update on the Ethics of Mandating HPV Vaccination

Following diagnosis, 66.2% of women with the disease survive 5 or more years.1 HPV causes the majority of cervical cancer cases.

Critical Illness and the Brain: Managing Risk for Cognitive Adverse Effects

Critical Illness and the Brain: Managing Risk for Cognitive Adverse Effects

The results highlight the importance of evaluating and monitoring cognitive function in individuals with recent critical illness or major infections, especially if they are already at risk for dementia.

Moral Hazard vs Morality Approaches in the Opioid Crisis

Moral Hazard vs Morality Approaches in the Opioid Crisis

Economists argue that because naloxone prevents overdoses, it also nudges users toward riskier behaviors. Physicians disagree.

Circadian Rhythm in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Using Chronotherapy to Improve Outcomes

Circadian Rhythm in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Using Chronotherapy to Improve Outcomes

Recent data suggest that the link between circadian rhythms of RA symptoms and the chronotherapy of RA is promising.

Technological Breakthroughs in Medicine Move Physician-Patient Interactions From The Computer Screen Back to the Exam Room

Technological Breakthroughs in Medicine Move Physician-Patient Interactions From The Computer Screen Back to the Exam Room

While technological breakthroughs have had positive effects in the corporate world, they have led to exacerbated physician burnout in the medical field.

Mental Health Problems in Adolescents With HIV: Overview & Expert Interview

Mental Health Problems in Adolescents With HIV: Overview & Expert Interview

Adolescents infected with HIV have a greater risk for psychiatric hospitalizations compared with those not infected with HIV.

Comorbidities in Multiple Sclerosis: Effects on DMTs, the Treatment Team, and More

Comorbidities in Multiple Sclerosis: Effects on DMTs, the Treatment Team, and More

Having a higher burden of comorbidities is associated with greater disability progression and lower QoL, as well as increased healthcare utilization and mortality.

Expanding Healthcare Access With Nurse-Led Care in Rheumatoid Arthritis

Expanding Healthcare Access With Nurse-Led Care in Rheumatoid Arthritis

A recent systematic review found that nurse-led care is effective, acceptable, and safe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

CNS Tumors in Childhood: Predicting Successful Independence in Adult Life

CNS Tumors in Childhood: Predicting Successful Independence in Adult Life

Researchers at St Jude Children's Research Hospital sought to determine what indicators in survivors of CNS tumors can predict the survivor's ability to live independently as an adult.

Exploring the Benefits of Virtual Reality Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

Exploring the Benefits of Virtual Reality Rehabilitation in Multiple Sclerosis

Future studies on VR training for MS should include large randomized controlled trials using clear protocols and comparable between-group tasks.

'Are We There Yet? How Much Longer?': Deciphering Patients' Persistent Questions

'Are We There Yet? How Much Longer?': Deciphering Patients' Persistent Questions

How do you answer when the patient or family asks, "What is next?" More importantly, though, you need to recognize if they are asking that question, or is there something else they are really asking.

Social Medicine: The Effect of Social Media on the Anti-Vaccine Movement

Social Medicine: The Effect of Social Media on the Anti-Vaccine Movement

The anti-vaccine movement has proliferated over recent years, thanks in part to its most vocal proponents using social media to churn out often misleading information.

Designing the Therapeutic Space: Using Layout, Color, and Other Elements to Get Patients in the Right Frame of Mind

Designing the Therapeutic Space: Using Layout, Color, and Other Elements to Get Patients in the Right Frame of Mind

While there is no single way to design a conducive therapeutic room, mental health professionals can help ensure that clients have a comfortable therapeutic experience by keeping the area a welcoming, cozy, warm, and safe environment for emotionally vulnerable individuals.

Is Weight Stigma Worse Than Obesity? How to Provide More Compassionate Care

Is Weight Stigma Worse Than Obesity? How to Provide More Compassionate Care

Obesity rates are nearly 40% among US adults, but traditional treatment methods are found to contribute to weight stigma, creating a population that's unhealthier than ever.

Essentials of Wound Care: Alternative Treatments in Wound Management

Essentials of Wound Care: Alternative Treatments in Wound Management

The efficacy of nonpharmacologic agents for wound care should encourage discussion of their usefulness and appropriateness in wound management.

How Often Should We Test for Hepatitis C in People Who Inject Drugs?

How Often Should We Test for Hepatitis C in People Who Inject Drugs?

A major challenge associated with hepatitis screening is the loss to follow-up that occurs in people who inject drugs.

Pediatric Migraine: Evidence-Based Alternative Management

Pediatric Migraine: Evidence-Based Alternative Management

Recent high-quality clinical trial evidence has demonstrated that medications commonly prescribed for migraine prevention in pediatric patients were not superior to placebo for reducing headache symptoms.

Striking a Balance Between Opioid Surveillance and Patient Privacy

Striking a Balance Between Opioid Surveillance and Patient Privacy

Big data has enabled public health authorities to identify doctor-shopping patients and those who needed treatment for opioid abuse. The trade-off, however, could be patient and provider privacy.

Correctional Psychiatry: Challenges and Rewards

Correctional Psychiatry: Challenges and Rewards

Approximately 15% of incarcerated people have serious mental illness, although that number can vary depending on the type of illness.

Mistaking Legal Recourse for Evidence-Based Medical Practices in Surrogacy

Mistaking Legal Recourse for Evidence-Based Medical Practices in Surrogacy

Paying a surrogate to carry a fetus shoehorns a fourth, and fifth, party into the already tight therapeutic triangle formed by the biological mom, fetus, and physician.

Climate Change: Dire Implications for Respiratory Conditions

Climate Change: Dire Implications for Respiratory Conditions

Changing pollination patterns, extreme weather events, rising sea levels, air pollution, and extreme temperatures all negatively affect respiratory conditions.

The Doctor Will @ You Now: Social Media MD Shares Strategies

The Doctor Will @ You Now: Social Media MD Shares Strategies

Farris K. Timimi, MD, and Lee Aase from the Mayo Clinic Social Media Network shared their views on the role of social media in physician practice.

Is Mandatory Reporting of Child Maltreatment in the Best Interests of the Child?

Is Mandatory Reporting of Child Maltreatment in the Best Interests of the Child?

The complexities and ambiguities associated with reporting suspected cases of child abuse can contribute to confusion and the potential for harm.

Gender and Multiple Sclerosis: How It Influences Prognosis and Future Treatment

Gender and Multiple Sclerosis: How It Influences Prognosis and Future Treatment

A rapid increase in the female-to-male ratio of MS incidence has been observed through several population studies.

Exclusion Criteria for Bipolar Trials Cast Doubt on Generalizability

Exclusion Criteria for Bipolar Trials Cast Doubt on Generalizability

Eligibility criteria employed in clinical trials assessing pharmacologic treatment of bipolar disorder typically preclude many affected patients, casting doubt about the generalizability of their results.

Penicillin Allergies: Commonly Reported but Rarely Accurate

Penicillin Allergies: Commonly Reported but Rarely Accurate

As infections from drug-resistant microbes continue to rise, the development of new antibiotics has declined since the golden age of antibiotic discovery in the mid-20th century.

Nomophobia: The Modern-Day Pathology

Nomophobia: The Modern-Day Pathology

People are increasingly finding themselves dependent on their mobile phones, and separating themselves from their devices has been associated with high levels of anxiety, as well as feelings of panic and stress.

Incorporating Guidelines Into Clinical Practice: An Interview With Gary L. LeRoy, MD

Incorporating Guidelines Into Clinical Practice: An Interview With Gary L. LeRoy, MD

Despite their advantages, many clinicians do not necessarily agree with the centrality or content of CPGs. Others — especially primary care physicians (PCPs) — are overwhelmed by the vast and ever-increasing numbers of guidelines issued by multiple societies.

ASPREE Trial: Aspirin Associated With Higher Mortality, Hemorrhage Risk in Older Adults

ASPREE Trial: Aspirin Associated With Higher Mortality, Hemorrhage Risk in Older Adults

The use of aspirin in healthy elderly patients as a preventative strategy was associated with no prolongation of long-term disability-free survival compared with placebo.

Toward Integrated Care for Hepatitis C Infection and Addiction

Toward Integrated Care for Hepatitis C Infection and Addiction

There is an opportunity to improve HCV treatment rates for people who inject drugs by integrating DAA therapy into current models of community-based addiction.

Primary Periodic Paralysis: A Physician's Personal Experience as a Patient

Primary Periodic Paralysis: A Physician's Personal Experience as a Patient

Neurology Advisor spoke with Annabelle Baughan, a retired hematologist-oncologist, who discussed her personal experience with Andersen-Tawil syndrome.

Doctors and the D Word: Talking About Death Is an Essential Skill — and One Often Lacking

Doctors and the D Word: Talking About Death Is an Essential Skill — and One Often Lacking

The reasons for physicians' discomfort with conversations about dying are as much cultural, social, and systemic as they are personal.

Parkinson Disease and the Gut: Treatment Potential Abounds

Parkinson Disease and the Gut: Treatment Potential Abounds

Current evidence highlights the potential role of cross-talk between the enteric and central nervous systems and the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease.

Fitness Wearables Are Finding a Place in Oncology Care

Fitness Wearables Are Finding a Place in Oncology Care

Wearable activity monitors offer oncology care teams an unbiased glimpse into patients' health behaviors and improved reports on performance status.

"Is It Just a Phase?" What to Do When Transgender Youths Ask to Transition

"Is It Just a Phase?" What to Do When Transgender Youths Ask to Transition

In the last 5 years, many clinicians have faced tough questions about how best to serve transgender youth while doing no harm.

Triclosan and Cancer Risk: Is There a Link?

Triclosan and Cancer Risk: Is There a Link?

Some studies suggest triclosan could have oncogenic properties, but more research is needed to confirm a causal link.

Dietary Supplements in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Commonly Used, Rarely Disclosed

Dietary Supplements in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Commonly Used, Rarely Disclosed

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis often use natural-product dietary supplements, but few disclose this to their healthcare providers.

Ethical Challenges of Nusinersen: Considerations When Counseling on Treatment

Ethical Challenges of Nusinersen: Considerations When Counseling on Treatment

Although regarded as a miracle drug to some, nusinersen comes with some troublesome strings attached.

Descriptive, Predictive Data at Odds in Medical Malpractice Courtroom

Descriptive, Predictive Data at Odds in Medical Malpractice Courtroom

Because they're busy looking in different directions, "innocent until proven guilty" and "first, do no harm" don't always get along.

Internet Browsing for Cancer Information Emphasizes Visual Appeal Over Accuracy

Internet Browsing for Cancer Information Emphasizes Visual Appeal Over Accuracy

Information patients find online can be a great concern for oncology nurses, especially when a diagnosis has an uncertain prognosis. In this follow-up study, researchers in Boston sought to determine the quality of the online resources patients with cancer, particularly pancreas, are finding.

Mind-Body Therapy and Psychiatry: Ancient Tools for Modern Practice

Mind-Body Therapy and Psychiatry: Ancient Tools for Modern Practice

Meditation techniques have an ever-growing evidence base to support their use and have become increasingly accepted in Western medicine as helpful adjuncts to other therapies.

Is Using Genealogy Data to Solve Crimes Taking DNA Analysis a Step Too Far?

Is Using Genealogy Data to Solve Crimes Taking DNA Analysis a Step Too Far?

The case of the Golden State Killer has set a new precedent for using public genealogy databases to solve previously unsolvable crimes.

Abuse-Deterrent Opioid Formulations: Barriers to Broader Use

Abuse-Deterrent Opioid Formulations: Barriers to Broader Use

Abuse-deterrent opioid formulations have not yet been widely accepted despite their proposed value in reducing opioid abuse and related mortality. Many of the current barriers to broader use are related to their higher cost compared with conventional formulations.

Reproductive Recourse: Why Are Reproductive Malpractice Claims So Challenging?

Reproductive Recourse: Why Are Reproductive Malpractice Claims So Challenging?

A new generation of DNA tests that analyze fetal DNA are seen as a safe and reliable godsend for expectant mothers because, according to the manufacturers, they achieve "near-perfect" accuracy.

The Ethics of Consumer Genetic Testing for Huntington Disease: Peaked Interest Has Clinicians Concerned

The Ethics of Consumer Genetic Testing for Huntington Disease: Peaked Interest Has Clinicians Concerned

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing would enable consumers to bypass the safeguards set forth by professional guidelines, which could potentially increase the risk for harm associated with testing.

Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Ethical Questions and Surgical Contraindications

Body Dysmorphic Disorder: Ethical Questions and Surgical Contraindications

The potential consequences of providing cosmetic treatment to a patient with BDD can extend beyond ethical concerns.

FDA Approval of Medication With a Digital Monitoring System: Major Breakthrough or "Brave New World"?

FDA Approval of Medication With a Digital Monitoring System: Major Breakthrough or "Brave New World"?

Abilify MyCite adds a digital sensor to the medication aripiprazole. The sensor, an ingestible event marker, is activated by contact with stomach acids and transmits a signal to a skin patch the patient wears, which then transmits to an app.

Cannabis for Multiple Sclerosis: Prescriber's Perspective

Cannabis for Multiple Sclerosis: Prescriber's Perspective

Cannabis has been shown to reduce the use of prescription drugs that have more numerous and serious side effects, including opioids, benzodiazepines, and antidepressants.

Smartphone Applications for Depression and Anxiety: Are They Ready for Widespread Use?

Smartphone Applications for Depression and Anxiety: Are They Ready for Widespread Use?

Despite concerns that the digital revolution in psychiatry might lessen the importance of interpersonal relationships between patient and clinician, digital apps have the potential to make the therapeutic alliance even more powerful.

Should You Record Your Patient Encounters? An Interview With James Ryan, DO

Should You Record Your Patient Encounters? An Interview With James Ryan, DO

Patients are increasingly recording physician visits on their phones, should physicians do the same.

Point-Counterpoint: Should We Implement Needle Exchange Programs for the Prevention of Hepatitis C Virus?

Point-Counterpoint: Should We Implement Needle Exchange Programs for the Prevention of Hepatitis C Virus?

Of the approximately 12.7 to 16 million people who inject drugs (PWID) worldwide, an estimated 10 million individuals have hepatitis C virus (HCV), making it the most prevalent infectious disease in this population.

Subclinical Hypothyroidism: Controversies in Testing and Treatment

Subclinical Hypothyroidism: Controversies in Testing and Treatment

Divergent recommendations in guidelines from the USPSTF and the ATA/AACE contribute to the controversy surrounding whether to test and treat for subclinical hypothyroidism.

Internet "Challenges" and Teenagers: a Guide for Primary Care Providers

Internet "Challenges" and Teenagers: a Guide for Primary Care Providers

Discussions involving Internet challenges with children and adolescents should be as sensitive as those about sexuality and drug or alcohol use.

Social Media and Adolescents: What Are the Health Risks?

Social Media and Adolescents: What Are the Health Risks?

Primary care providers should screen for depression and other health-related risks associated with the use of social media by adolescents.

Does Right to Try Legislation Improve on Existing Compassionate Use Programs?

Does Right to Try Legislation Improve on Existing Compassionate Use Programs?

While politicians celebrate the passage of the Right to Try Act, physicians must closely monitor the outcomes to mitigate the potential consequences of this law.

Disrupting the Status Quo: Improving Emergency Care for Transgender Patients Is a Medical Necessity

Disrupting the Status Quo: Improving Emergency Care for Transgender Patients Is a Medical Necessity

Stigma and harassment in a medical setting are not uncommon in the 1.4 million Americans who identify as transgender or gender-nonconforming. It's time for healthcare providers to change the status quo.

From Abused Child to Serial Killer: Investigating Nature vs Nurture in Methods of Murder

From Abused Child to Serial Killer: Investigating Nature vs Nurture in Methods of Murder

Not all abused children become serial killers, and not all serial killers are victims of childhood abuse. However, the connection between the two cannot be dismissed as just coincidence.

An Underappreciated Vulnerability: Medical Devices

An Underappreciated Vulnerability: Medical Devices

Hackers' attempts to steal data could lead to malfunction of MRI machines, implantable defibrillators, insulin pumps, and other devices.

Medical Clearance of Psych Patients in the ED: Consensus Recommendations

Medical Clearance of Psych Patients in the ED: Consensus Recommendations

An AAEP task force created recommendations for medical evaluation of psychiatric patients presenting to the ED.

Should Physicians Treat Family and Friends? Three Experts Weigh In

Should Physicians Treat Family and Friends? Three Experts Weigh In

Although all of the guidelines acknowledge that there are emergent situations in which providing care for a family member or friend is not only permissible but also essential, other situations are frowned upon.

Transference in the Age of #MeToo: What Counts as Harassment From a Patient?

Transference in the Age of #MeToo: What Counts as Harassment From a Patient?

The psychological effect on psychiatrist victims should be acknowledged even when the behavior of the perpetrator can be explained by diagnosis.

Keeping Politics Out of Patient Care: Interview With Anupam B. Jena, MD

Keeping Politics Out of Patient Care: Interview With Anupam B. Jena, MD

To shed further light on the study's implications, MPR interviewed lead author Anupam B. Jena, MD, PhD, Ruth L. Newhouse Associate Professor, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

How Many Chances Are Too Many? Treating Recurrent Infective Endocarditis in IV Drug Users

How Many Chances Are Too Many? Treating Recurrent Infective Endocarditis in IV Drug Users

How many second chances should a drug user get? As many as it takes for us — physicians, society, government, and the healthcare system — to get it right.

Prisoners to Parental Incarceration: How Do Incarceration Rates Affect Infant Mortality?

Prisoners to Parental Incarceration: How Do Incarceration Rates Affect Infant Mortality?

The staggering number of incarcerated Americans has inspired an avalanche of studies demonstrating how patterns of imprisonment exacerbate inequality and affect the life chances of entire families.

A Few Bad Apples: Managing Malpractice Claims

A Few Bad Apples: Managing Malpractice Claims

Ranking or otherwise gauging physician quality isn't just a way to assign bragging rights — performance metrics can be used to set reimbursement levels, tailor insurance, and identify physicians who are falling behind.

New Dimensions in Psychopathy: Are There Cultural Differences in Psychopaths?

New Dimensions in Psychopathy: Are There Cultural Differences in Psychopaths?

Offenders with major psychopathic traits can be identified in all ethnic groups that have been studied, including European Americans, African Americans, and Latino Americans, but some of the evidence pointing to the validity of psychopathy is stronger in European Americans.

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