Editor's Picks

Physician Suicides: Then and Now

Since Gerry FitzGerald's suicide 80 years ago, physician suicide has become a staggering public health crisis that's gone largely ignored.

Resuscitating Premature Infants Against Parental Wishes

The decision to resuscitate an extremely premature newborn is governed by a patchwork of state-level laws that are not necessarily grounded in evidence-based medicine.

Should Physicians Monitor Patients' Sexual Orientation?

Two clinicians sound off regarding proposed sexual orientation monitoring in health and social care settings.

Telehealth: Changing the Physician-Patient Relationship

Additional studies are needed to assess the use of telehealth in urgent and primary care triage, teledermatology, and the management of serious pediatric conditions.

CVS/Aetna Merger May Affect Primary Care

In the new partnership, Aetna will have access to data on pharmaceutical usage patterns that will allow the company to carefully parse the insurance risks it takes on.

Is Concierge Medicine Sustainable?

One of the major pitfalls of concierge medicine is that physicians must limit their practice to guarantee the accessibility offered by the model in exchange for the retainer.

Examining Overdiagnosis in Medicine

Physicians need to think about ethical problems in a way that allows a balance of competing priorities and also leaves room for personalized decision-making.

Should Physicians Facilitate Lethal Injection Executions?

While some support physician participation in lethal injection, others view it as a clear violation of the Hippocratic Oath.

Latest Features

What's Torture Good For? Absolutely Nothing

What's Torture Good For? Absolutely Nothing

Torture has always had its place as a two-faced mythical creature in American society, but no neuroscientific backing for the practice exists.

Examining the Crisis of Physician Suicides: Then and Now

Examining the Crisis of Physician Suicides: Then and Now

Since Gerry FitzGerald's suicide 80 years ago, physician suicide has become a staggering public health crisis that's gone largely ignored.

When Hard Cases Make Bad Law: Evidence-Based Recommendations vs Legal Precedence for Resuscitation of Premature Infants

When Hard Cases Make Bad Law: Evidence-Based Recommendations vs Legal Precedence for Resuscitation of Premature Infants

The decision to resuscitate an extremely premature newborn is governed by a patchwork of state-level laws that are not necessarily grounded in evidence-based medicine.

Latest Blogs

When Body Language Says What Words Cannot: Interpreting Patients' Unspoken Messages

When Body Language Says What Words Cannot: Interpreting Patients' Unspoken Messages

Sometimes what someone says with body language is clear, but sometimes it's not — and physicians need to do a little exploring.

Prior Authorization Equals Current Frustration: Challenges in Practice

Prior Authorization Equals Current Frustration: Challenges in Practice

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Insurance companies believe that if there are enough hurdles to jump over — and if the hurdles are high enough — patients and physicians might stop running.

Medical Malpractice: A Closer Look at Payout Redistribution

Medical Malpractice: A Closer Look at Payout Redistribution

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A recent bill passed in the US House of Representatives proposes a number of changes to malpractice liability rules, including a $250,000 cap on non-economic damages.

Electronic Health Records: Is It Time to Uncouple Billing and Documentation Requirements?

Electronic Health Records: Is It Time to Uncouple Billing and Documentation Requirements?

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In the age of the EHR, physicians enjoy improved access to patient information and data, but additional regulatory and documentation requirements have impaired how physicians practice medicine.

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