Neurology

Exploring the Long-Term Effects of Head Injuries on Mental Health

Exploring the Long-Term Effects of Head Injuries on Mental Health

Mental health assessments may be a helpful aspect to the presport evaluation if those in need have access to care.

Cerebrospinal Fluid and MRI Findings May Predict Alzheimer's Dementia Risk

Cerebrospinal Fluid and MRI Findings May Predict Alzheimer's Dementia Risk

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Abnormal cerebrospinal fluid and magnetic resonance imaging findings are highly predictive of Alzheimer disease dementia risk in patients with mild cognitive impairment.

Outcomes With Early vs Delayed Statin Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

Outcomes With Early vs Delayed Statin Therapy for Acute Ischemic Stroke

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Results of early statin therapy within 24 hours of hospital admission are similar to delayed statin intervention for reducing 90-day disability in patients with acute ischemic stroke.

Changing the Culture of Publication Bias in Neurology Research

Changing the Culture of Publication Bias in Neurology Research

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The need for data transparency carries an ethical and moral obligation and requires nonselective and unbiased publication of clinical results.

Examining the Link Between Migraines and Gastrointestinal Disorders

Examining the Link Between Migraines and Gastrointestinal Disorders

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Researchers are examining theories on the interplay between the GI tract and the brain.

Clinical Update: Utilizing Ischemic Preconditioning in Ischemic Stroke

Clinical Update: Utilizing Ischemic Preconditioning in Ischemic Stroke

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One of the most promising avenues of research is the concept of hypoxic conditioning, or ischemic preconditioning, in which brief periods of oxygen deprivation to the brain have been shown to provide neuroprotective effects that reduce stroke infarct size and improve recovery times.

Overlapping Surgery Does Not Compromise Patient Safety in Complex Neurosurgical Cases

Overlapping Surgery Does Not Compromise Patient Safety in Complex Neurosurgical Cases

For patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures, overlapping surgery is not associated with morbidity, mortality, or worsened functional status.

Palliative Care in Huntington Disease: What Every Clinician Should Consider

Palliative Care in Huntington Disease: What Every Clinician Should Consider

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Palliative and hospice care play an important role in the long-term management of Hungtington disease, including ongoing symptom relief measures, caregiver support, and end-of-life care.

Clinical Update: Impact of Anesthetics on the Brain

Clinical Update: Impact of Anesthetics on the Brain

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Findings from animal studies indicate that general anesthesia may be neurotoxic and could result in long-term central nervous system alterations and cognitive dysfunction, particularly in very young or elderly patients

Concussion Impact on White Matter Modified by Football Career Duration, Position

Concussion Impact on White Matter Modified by Football Career Duration, Position

Researchers examined the correlation between exposure to concussive and subconcussive head impacts, white matter integrity, and functional task-related neural activity in 61 cognitively unimpaired former collegiate and professional football players.

Careful Design of ECT Research Important for Ethical Concerns

Careful Design of ECT Research Important for Ethical Concerns

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Although electroconvulsive therapy is effective for patients with severe psychiatric disorders, various misconceptions still exist.

Contact Sport Controversy:  Are Our Brains Worth the Risk?

Contact Sport Controversy: Are Our Brains Worth the Risk?

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As a former ice hockey player myself, I know this game, too, needs to change in order to protect the brains of our current and future generations.

Five Uses for Virtual Reality in Healthcare

Five Uses for Virtual Reality in Healthcare

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Virtual reality has become much more than just a new form of entertainment; it is increasingly being used in a wide range of medical applications.

Acute Ischemic Stroke Rates Increasing in Younger Americans

Acute Ischemic Stroke Rates Increasing in Younger Americans

An increasing prevalence of stroke risk factors were also seen.

Q&A: How To Transition Pediatric Patients into Adult Care

Q&A: How To Transition Pediatric Patients into Adult Care

Having these discussions and providing this guidance should be an expectation of good care.

Medication Linked to Cognitive Impairment Is Frequently Prescribed to Elderly OAB Patients

Medication Linked to Cognitive Impairment Is Frequently Prescribed to Elderly OAB Patients

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Cognitive impairment is an especially worrisome adverse effect in older patients.

Link Identified Between Alzheimer's Disease and Fungus

Link Identified Between Alzheimer's Disease and Fungus

Witnessing a loved one succumb to Alzheimers disease (AD) is one of the most difficult experiences a person has to deal with. Signs of the disease appear slowly at first. The affected individual may forget a word or misplace an object, which is something that happens to everyone from time to time. But then it gets more serious.

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Research Continues

Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy: The Research Continues

Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is defined as a progressive degenerative disease of the brain often found in athletes (and others) with an associated history of repetitive brain trauma.

Smart Pills on the Horizon: Can Nootropics Actually Improve Brain Function?

Smart Pills on the Horizon: Can Nootropics Actually Improve Brain Function?

In the movie Limitless, a struggling author with writers block stumbles across a new smart drug called NZT-48. Desperate, he takes the pill and then finds himself extremely productive. He is able to learn and analyze new information at an astonishing rate, recall memories from his distant past, and even write 90 pages of his book in one sitting.

Teens Start Misusing ADHD Drugs & Other Stimulants Earlier Than You Might Think

Teens Start Misusing ADHD Drugs & Other Stimulants Earlier Than You Might Think

Despite stereotypes about college students resorting to black-market Ritalin to help them cram for exams, young people are actually most likely to start misusing prescription stimulant drugs in their high school years, according to new University of Michigan Medical School research.

Neuroimaging Findings Generally Nondiagnostic in Children and Adolescents

Neuroimaging Findings Generally Nondiagnostic in Children and Adolescents

Researchers from the Canada North Concussion Network in Manitoba examined neuroimaging studies obtained in children and adolescents with sports-related concussions and found that the images appeared normal in 78% of cases. Detailed findings of this study are reported and discussed in "Neuroimaging findings in pediatric sports-related concussion" by Michael J. Ellis, MD, and colleagues, published today online, ahead of print, in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics.

What Autism Can Teach Us About Brain Cancer

What Autism Can Teach Us About Brain Cancer

Applying lessons learned from autism to brain cancer, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University have discovered why elevated levels of the protein NHE9 add to the lethality of the most common and aggressive form of brain cancer, glioblastoma.

Researchers Make New Discoveries in Key Pathway for Neurological Diseases

Researchers Make New Discoveries in Key Pathway for Neurological Diseases

A new intermediate step and unexpected enzymatic activity in a metabolic pathway in the body, which could lead to new drug design for psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases, has been discovered by researchers at Georgia State University.

Epilepsy Research Opens a Window on the Brain

Epilepsy Research Opens a Window on the Brain

Rapidly emerging technologies, novel imaging techniques, and the development of new therapies and new genes have given researchers and clinicians an extraordinary ability to explore the brain at the cellular, genetic, and neural levels.

Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

Alice in Wonderland Syndrome

Todds syndrome, more frequently referred to as Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), is a disorienting neurological condition that primarily targets children.

Can Bariatric Surgery Lead to Severe Headache?

Can Bariatric Surgery Lead to Severe Headache?

Bariatric surgery may be a risk factor for a condition that causes severe headaches, according to a study published in the October 22, 2014 online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Study Finds Link Between Neural Stem Cell Overgrowth and Autism-Like Behavior in Mice

Study Finds Link Between Neural Stem Cell Overgrowth and Autism-Like Behavior in Mice

People with autism spectrum disorder often experience a period of accelerated brain growth after birth. No one knows why or whether the change is linked to any specific behavioral changes. A new study by UCLA researchers demonstrates how, in pregnant mice, inflammation, a first-line defense of the immune system, can trigger an excessive division of neural stem cells that can cause overgrowth in the offsprings brain. The paper appeared October 9 in the online edition of the journal Stem Cell Reports.

Memory Slips May Signal Increased Risk of Dementia Years Later

Memory Slips May Signal Increased Risk of Dementia Years Later

New research suggests that people without dementia who begin reporting memory issues may be more likely to develop dementia later, even if they currently have no clinical signs. The study is published in the September 24, 2014 online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Yoga Relieves Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

Yoga Relieves Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

Paula Meltzer was only 38 when out of nowhere everything she looked at was blurry. For the single mother, who had a lucrative career as a gemologist and spent hours examining valuable pieces of jewelry, it seemed as if—in a split second—her life changed.

Scripps Florida Scientists Make Diseased Cells Synthesize Their Own Drug

Scripps Florida Scientists Make Diseased Cells Synthesize Their Own Drug

In a new study that could ultimately lead to many new medicines, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have adapted a chemical approach to turn diseased cells into unique manufacturing sites for molecules that can treat a form of muscular dystrophy.

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