medicine

FDA Approves Mavyret for Treatment of Hepatitis C

FDA Approves Mavyret for Treatment of Hepatitis C

Mavyret has been approved by the FDA to treat adults with certain types of chronic hepatitis C virus.

Physicians Are Still Prescribing Too Many Opioids in the US

Physicians Are Still Prescribing Too Many Opioids in the US

More than 1 out of 3 average Americans used a prescription opioid in 2015, despite growing concerns these medications are promoting addiction and overdose deaths.

Comprehensive Initiative Has Positive Impact on Opioid Prescribing

Comprehensive Initiative Has Positive Impact on Opioid Prescribing

A comprehensive initiative, including creation of prescribing and dispensing policies, can have a positive impact on opioid prescribing.

Change in Generic Drug Prices Linked to Market Competition

Change in Generic Drug Prices Linked to Market Competition

The study noted a price change of -31.7% for quadropoly and 47.4% for monopoly.

A Closer Look Into the Drugged-Driving Epidemic

A Closer Look Into the Drugged-Driving Epidemic

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There's no doubt that drugged driving is a growing problem, and one that, coincidentally or not, dovetails with expanding decriminalization of marijuana around the country.

Transplant Surgery: Are We Doing Enough (Of It)?

Transplant Surgery: Are We Doing Enough (Of It)?

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Informed decisions that would allow safe, controlled and efficient organ donations in the absence of a declaration of brain or cardiac death remains a complete nonstarter.

Serious Physician Shortage Is Anticipated in the Absence of Broad Intervention Measures

Serious Physician Shortage Is Anticipated in the Absence of Broad Intervention Measures

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Acute physician shortages are expected, irrespective of the type of provider setting or geographic location.

Multilevel Approach Needed to Reduce Overdiagnosis, Argues Epidemiologist

Multilevel Approach Needed to Reduce Overdiagnosis, Argues Epidemiologist

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Dr Elmore suggests several strategies to tackle the problem of overdiagnosis.

Achieving Diversity Is the Responsibility of the Entire Medical Community

Achieving Diversity Is the Responsibility of the Entire Medical Community

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"One does not have to be black, lower class, gay or disabled to help foster diversity, inclusion and equity."

About 1 in 5 Patients Received Different Diagnoses After Second Opinions

About 1 in 5 Patients Received Different Diagnoses After Second Opinions

In this study, 21% of cases received final diagnoses that were distinctly different than their referral diagnoses.

Female Doctors Underrepresented Among Grand Rounds Speakers

Female Doctors Underrepresented Among Grand Rounds Speakers

Women presented a median of 28.3% of the total sessions.

Home Births: Responding to a Cultural Shift in Medicine

Home Births: Responding to a Cultural Shift in Medicine

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We can no longer dismiss the dissatisfaction many women feel with the medicalization of the birthing experience.

Automatic Refill or Automatic Profit?

Automatic Refill or Automatic Profit?

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A few years ago several of the large pharmaceutical chains started offering automatic refills for convenience. On the surface this seems like a great idea for patients, as they no longer need to call the pharmacy for refills.

The New James: Ohio State Creates a Model for Cancer Hospitals to Come

The New James: Ohio State Creates a Model for Cancer Hospitals to Come

Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC-James) dedicates its new 1.1-million-square-foot, 21-floor freestanding cancer hospital on November 7, it will be the third-largest cancer hospital in the country, and the most innovative cancer hospital to date.

The Dwindling Stock of Antibiotics, and What to Do About It

The Dwindling Stock of Antibiotics, and What to Do About It

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said that at least 2 million Americans are sickened by antibiotic-resistant infections each year and survive. (Twenty-three thousand die.) These experiences leave deep impressions not just on the patients but on their family and friends.

Sweet! Honey Making a Comeback as a Topical Treatment for Wounds

Sweet! Honey Making a Comeback as a Topical Treatment for Wounds

Honey has been used since ancient times as a delicious natural sweetener, but did you know that the substance was also known for thousands of years for its medicinal properties? Healers would wrap wounds with dressings made of sugar and honey, but with the development of antibiotics over half a century ago, the treatment faded into the recesses of history. Today, some doctors are reviving the old remedy at times when modern medicine has failed in treating a patient.

Scripps Florida Scientists Make Diseased Cells Synthesize Their Own Drug

Scripps Florida Scientists Make Diseased Cells Synthesize Their Own Drug

In a new study that could ultimately lead to many new medicines, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have adapted a chemical approach to turn diseased cells into unique manufacturing sites for molecules that can treat a form of muscular dystrophy.

Pepper and Halt: Spicy Chemical May Inhibit Gut Tumors

Pepper and Halt: Spicy Chemical May Inhibit Gut Tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that dietary capsaicin—the active ingredient in chili peppers—produces chronic activation of a receptor on cells lining the intestines of mice, triggering a reaction that ultimately reduces the risk of colorectal tumors. The findings have been published in the August 1, 2014 issue of The Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Top 10 New Drugs up for FDA Approval

Top 10 New Drugs up for FDA Approval

With the numerous advancements being made in medicine every day, its easy to forget how long it can take for a treatment to go from the lab to the hands of a patient.

Experimental Drug to Treat Ebola Tested in 3 Patients as Virus Continues to Spread

Experimental Drug to Treat Ebola Tested in 3 Patients as Virus Continues to Spread

As of August 15, 2014, the Ebola virus has infected at least 2127 people this year in West Africa, claiming the lives of 1145 and making it the deadliest outbreak of the virus in history. As the death toll continues to rise, experts are scrambling desperately to control the outbreak. In the latest effort to treat victims, a group of ethicists gathered by the World Health Organization (WHO) unanimously concluded that it is ethical to offer experimental drugs that have never been tested on humans to fight the virus, even if their effectiveness or adverse effects are unknown. The large number of people affected by the 2014 West Africa outbreak, and the high case-fatality rate, have prompted calls to use investigational medical interventions to try to save the lives of patients and to curb the epidemic, the WHO said on August 12.

Higher Chance of Hospital Death Found in Areas Where Emergency Departments Have Closed

Higher Chance of Hospital Death Found in Areas Where Emergency Departments Have Closed

In the first analysis of its kind, UC San Francisco research shows that emergency department closures can have a ripple effect on patient outcomes at nearby hospitals.

Daylight Is the Best Medicine, for Nurses

Daylight Is the Best Medicine, for Nurses

In a forthcoming Cornell study published in the journal Health Environments Research and Design, Rana Zadeh, assistant professor of design and environmental analysis, discovered nurses who had access to natural light enjoyed significantly lower blood pressure, communicated more often with their colleagues, laughed more and served their patients in better moods than nurses who settled for large doses of artificial light.

Health Officials Recommend Flu Spray Over Shot for Kids

Health Officials Recommend Flu Spray Over Shot for Kids

According to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, a panel of US health officials that makes recommendations to the CDC regarding which vaccines people should get, children between the ages of 2 and 8 years should use the nasal spray over the shot when it comes to the flu vaccine. Studies show that kids within that age group are about half as likely to get the flu after a squirt in the nose rather than a shot in the arm.

Antidepressant Plus Addiction Medication Are Elements of New Weight-Loss Drug

Antidepressant Plus Addiction Medication Are Elements of New Weight-Loss Drug

On Wednesday, June 11, a new prescription weight-loss medication that combines a popular antidepressant with a medication for addiction will be reviewed by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for potential approval. Losing excess weight and keeping it off is not as easy as simply popping the right pill, but medications can be a part of a healthy weight-loss diet, says an internationally recognized medical weight-loss specialist. Prescription drugs are no substitute for low-fat, high-fiber balanced diets coupled with regular exercise but medication can help increase weight loss in some people, says Bipan Chand, MD, FACS, FASMBS, FASGE, director of The Loyola Center for Metabolic Surgery Bariatric Care.

Bringing Hypnosis out of the Mystical and into the Practical: Is It Real?

Bringing Hypnosis out of the Mystical and into the Practical: Is It Real?

On February 9, 1978, 12-year-old Kimberly Leach realized that she had left her purse in one of her classes at Lake City Junior High School in Lake City, Florida and returned to the classroom to retrieve it after a school assembly. That was the last time she was seen, until her body was found 2 months later near the Suwannee River approximately 35 miles west of the school. The only witness to Kimberly's abduction was Clarence Anderson, who said he saw a young girl in front of the school being led to a white van by a man he thought was her father. However, he was unable to provide a detailed description of either the man or the girl he observed. At the request of Assistant State Attorney Bob Dekle, Anderson subsequently underwent 2 hypnosis sessions, after which he was successfully able to describe in detail their clothing and identify the murderer as the infamous serial killer Ted Bundy.

Alternative Medicine in Rheumatology

Alternative Medicine in Rheumatology

Patients, with or without their physicians consent (and notwithstanding specific recommendations to the contrary), often turn to alternative medicines, such as herbal supplements and therapies like acupuncture, for help with symptoms of rheumatologic ailments. Most of the conflict relates to medicines and supplements, rather than treatments and therapies such as acupuncture or yoga. Because the latter two get the most praise from integrative medicine providers, let's look at recent news about herbal medicines and supplements.

Laughter Therapy Shown to Boost Immune Function in Cancer Patients

Laughter Therapy Shown to Boost Immune Function in Cancer Patients

Laughter really is the best medicine There's no doubt that laughter is contagious. Who hasn't experienced breaking out into uncontrollable laughter just by watching someone else laugh, even without having any idea what was so funny? A unique case out of Tanzania details a reported "laughter epidemic" that started with 3 girls, spread throughout their boarding school in Kashasha, and affected 95 of its 159 students. The epidemic lasted 16 days until the school was forced to close, but it didn't stop there. It further spread to neighboring villages, ultimately lasting 6 to 18 months, closing down 14 schools, and affecting 1000 people in total.

Little-Known Medicinal Plants and Herbs

Little-Known Medicinal Plants and Herbs

Plants and herbs are used in numerous pharmacological compounds. Many lesser-known ones have entered the mainstream and are used to treat health issues. These are most often found in vitamin shops, health food stores, drug stores, and even supermarkets. Here we are highlighting 3 herbs that are not commonly known, but may be headed to the forefront in the near future.

Advances in the Treatment of Lupus

Advances in the Treatment of Lupus

The study of lupus has come a long way over the past 2 decades. In 2011, the first lupus-specific treatment to appear in the last half century was FDA approved. Just 20 years ago, only about 40% of lupus patients lived beyond 3 years after diagnosis. Now, a normal lifespan is possible for most, when diagnosed early and monitored long term.

Will Virtual Doctors Become More Commonplace Than Face-to-Face Doctor Visits?

Will Virtual Doctors Become More Commonplace Than Face-to-Face Doctor Visits?

We are living in a world of convenience. Fast-food restaurants are around every corner, television shows can be streamed instantly, and the answer to almost any question is just a Google search away. Medicine is also becoming more convenient through health-centric smartphone apps and EMRs, but the real convenience lies with virtual doctors. For many practices, no longer will patients have to get out of bed and travel to their doctor's office when they are feeling sick. A virtual doctor is just a mouse click away.

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